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Representatives from CNI member organizations gather twice annually to explore new technologies, content, and applications; to further collaboration; to analyze technology policy issues, and to catalyze the development and deployment of new projects. Each member organization may send two representatives. Visit https://www.cni.org/mm/spring-2018 for more information.

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Wednesday, April 11
 

3:00pm

 
Thursday, April 12
 

8:30am

11:00am

Registration
Thursday April 12, 2018 11:00am - Friday April 13, 2018 2:00pm
California Foyer

11:30am

Orientation for First-time Attendees
Speakers
avatar for Clifford Lynch

Clifford Lynch

Executive Director, Coalition for Networked Information (CNI)
Clifford Lynch has led the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) since 1997. Prior to joining CNI, Lynch spent 18 years at the University of California Office of the President, the last 10 as Director of Library Automation. Lynch, who holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the... Read More →


Thursday April 12, 2018 11:30am - 12:15pm
La Jolla (1st FL)

12:15pm

Break
Thursday April 12, 2018 12:15pm - 1:15pm
California Foyer

1:15pm

Opening Plenary: Where All Roads Lead: Keeping the User at the Center
As anticipated, the Internet launched unprecedented access to information, and myriad opportunities to enrich our academic and everyday lives. As information professionals, we have developed many new systems for accessing and creating content, implemented new types of learning activities, and built facilities to make available emerging technologies. With so many options and choices, have we created information environments that are transparent and coherent to our user communities? Have we chosen the best areas of focus for teaching and learning with technology initiatives? Have our new buildings and renovations been developed with attention to a set of underlying principles that relate to the university’s mission? In this talk, Lippincott will focus on the relationship between user communities, information professionals, and the trajectories of developments in access to and creation of content, teaching and learning, and development of spaces and places. She will provide an overview of these areas, highlight exemplars, and raise questions about current practice and future trends.

Joan K. Lippincott is the Associate Executive Director of the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI), where she has provided leadership for programs in teaching and learning, learning spaces, digital scholarship, assessment, and collaboration among professional groups. She serves on the boards of the journal portal, The Reference Librarian, and the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (NDLTD) and on the advisory board of the Journal of Learning Spaces. She served on the board of the New Media Consortium (NMC) and on its advisory boards for the Horizon Report for both higher education and libraries. Joan is the current editor of the EDUCAUSE Review E-Content column, she is past chair of the Association of College & Research Libraries’ (ACRL) New Publications Board, and she served as a member of the ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards Review Task Force that produced the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. She has served on the Advisory Boards of the Learning Spaces Collaboratory, the Learning Space Toolkit project, and the EDUCAUSE ELI Seeking Evidence of Impact project. Joan has been a consultant for many academic libraries for their space renovation projects and has been on the planning committee for the Designing Libraries for the 21st Century conference since its inception.

Speakers
avatar for Joan Lippincott

Joan Lippincott

Associate Executive Director, Coalition for Networked Information


Thursday April 12, 2018 1:15pm - 2:15pm
California Ballroom AB

2:15pm

Break
Thursday April 12, 2018 2:15pm - 2:30pm
California Foyer

2:30pm

Avalon Media System Update: Piloting Avalon in the Cloud
Avalon Media System is an open source system, based on Fedora and Hydra repository technologies, that enables libraries and archives to more easily provide online access to digitized and born-digital audio and video collections for purposes of teaching, learning, and research. Now in its sixth major release, Avalon has been co-developed by the libraries at Indiana University Bloomington and Northwestern University, with support from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. One of the deliverables of the recent Mellon grant was to make it possible to run Avalon as a subscription software-as-a-service (SaaS) offering. As part of our most recent IMLS grant, we were able to partner with LYRASIS to run a pilot project with nine partner institutions that spanned a diverse range of use cases and institution types. The partner organizations included in the pilot were: Emerson College, Oberlin College, the University of Houston, the University of Oklahoma, the University of the Arts, DC Public Library, Houston Public Library, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the University of Tennessee Chattanooga. In addition, Northwestern University has been running its local instances of Avalon on Amazon Web Services since August 2017. This panel discussion will explore various aspects of the pilot, including an overview of pilot partner use cases, what went well and challenges encountered with pilot testing, and what is needed to make Avalon work for institutions interested in purchasing Avalon as a SaaS going forward. Additionally, the panel will discuss the lessons learned from the teams who have deployed the software both locally and in the cloud, share thoughts on how to organize the management of Avalon in the SaaS space, and summarize the real costs of running Avalon locally and in several cloud-based hosted environments.

Speakers
avatar for Carl Grant

Carl Grant

Interim Dean of University Libraries & CTO, OU Libraries
JH

John Herbert

Director of Digital Programs, LYRASIS
avatar for Evviva Weinraub

Evviva Weinraub

Associate University Librarian, Northwestern University
Fedora, Samvera, Avalon, and Digital Preservation.


Thursday April 12, 2018 2:30pm - 3:15pm
California Ballroom C

2:30pm

Cobweb: Collaborative Digital Collection Development for Web Archives
The demands of archiving the web in comprehensive breadth or thematic depth easily exceed the capacity of any single institution. As such, collaborative approaches to web archiving are necessary, and their success relies on curators understanding both what has already been archived, by whom, and how. With funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, Cobweb (a joint project of the California Digital Library, the University of California, Los Angeles, and Harvard University) supports three key functions of collaborative collection development: suggesting nominations, asserting claims, and reporting holdings. Curators establish thematic collecting projects in Cobweb and encourage nominators to suggest relevant web sites as candidates for archiving. For any given project, archival programs can claim their intention to capture a subset of nominated sites. Cobweb interacts with external data sources to populate a holdings registry, aggregating metadata about existing collections and crawled sites to support curators in planning future collecting activity and researchers in exploring archived web resources useful to their research. This project briefing will include a progress update on Cobweb development, a demonstration of Cobweb prototype interfaces, a summary of stakeholder feedback gathered thus far, and opportunities to engage in discussion about collaborative digital collection development.

Speakers
avatar for Kathryn Stine

Kathryn Stine

Manager, Digital Content Development and Strategy, California Digital Library


Thursday April 12, 2018 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Plaza C

2:30pm

Crafting an Active Collection for the Research Library
In 2016, The Claremont Colleges Library began to imagine what it might look like to provide access to our collections in ways that are informed by how our community uses those resources. From the beginning, this effort was a response to difficulties helping researchers connect our digital and physical resources, unsatisfactory storage space, and opportunities arising out of renovations and master planning. Through this work, we aim to ensure the organization and presentation of our collections support how our researchers need to work with them and be inspired by them. Over the past two years, we have engaged colleagues in other academic libraries on these questions. We have also convened task forces and conducted an in-depth, qualitative study to understand the different yet complementary engagements scholars have when browsing and searching print and electronic resources. In this presentation, we will review provocative conversations at Claremont and beyond about the future of print in the digital age, share what we are learning from our local investigations of research behaviors, and consider new ideas for an "Active Print" program.

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca L. Lubas

Rebecca L. Lubas

Associate Dean, Claremont Colleges Library
Rebecca L. Lubas is the Associate Dean of the Claremont Colleges Library. She in engaged in shared print initiatives as Chair of the Statewide California Electronic Library Consortium’s Shared Print Operations Group. Rebecca is also a member of the Program Steering Committee for... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Pickle

Sarah Pickle

Director of Organizational Planning & Assessment, Claremont Colleges Library


Thursday April 12, 2018 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Imperial Room

2:30pm

DePaul Makes: Building the Maker Community at DePaul University and Beyond
In 2017, DePaul University launched two maker spaces: the Idea Realization Lab in the College of Computing and Digital Media and the Maker Hub in the John T. Richardson Library. Initially planned and designed independently, maker spaces and services are increasingly coordinated through a community-centered approach toward "building the maker community at DePaul." This presentation will include discussion of the challenges inherent in coordinating a campus-wide approach to the use of new technology in a decentralized campus IT environment, it will identify initial programs designed to bring maker space programs together across campus, including articulation of student learning outcomes, and the design of faculty development initiatives. It will also explore ways in which maker technology is growing into a component in community engagement initiatives in a city with a "maker across the lifespan" approach, including collaboration with K-12 schools, public libraries, and start-up centers.

Speakers
MB

Megan Bernal

Associate University Librarian for Information Technology and Discovery Services, DePaul University
Looking to enhance your teaching or research with digital publishing tools? The Library provides a wide array of digital project and publishing support, including the digitization and digital preservation of audio, textual, and image files, open access publishing, online exhibits... Read More →
avatar for Janice Scurio

Janice Scurio

Information Technology Librarian, DePaul University
Former adjunct faculty @ UW-Madison SLIS, now second year academic librarian @ DePaul University in charge of our new makerspace and media studios. In charge of technology based learning and showing faculty how to integrate maker technology into curriculum. Former youth services librarian... Read More →
avatar for Scott Walter

Scott Walter

University Librarian, DePaul University
Scott Walter is University Librarian at DePaul University, an adjunct member of the faculty of the San Jose State University School of Information, and an Americas Regional Council delegate to the OCLC Global Council. Currently serving on the Global Council Program Committee and the... Read More →


Thursday April 12, 2018 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Santa Fe

2:30pm

Distributed Digital Assets: Digital Humanities & the Future Direction of SHARE
This panel will present results of a 2017 survey aimed at understanding how various stakeholders in digital humanities (DH) discover, create, and reuse digital scholarship, as well as the workflows and tools that DH scholars use at each stage of their research process. These stakeholders include researchers, librarians, and technologists. The survey is part of a National Endowment for the Humanities funded project, "Integrating Digital Humanities into the Web of Scholarship with SHARE." Combined with a workshop and series of site visits to DH centers on US and Canadian campuses, the project team is investigating how SHARE's metadata-harvesting technology can integrate with the world of DH registries, identifiers, and repositories to improve discovery and curation. The presentation will include discussion of the project as a community-facing use case for SHARE, and it will provide an outline of SHARE's overall trajectory for 2018, including: 1) refactoring of the harvesting framework; 2) placing greater emphasis on community code contribution; 3) developing a metadata reconciliation and editing pipeline. The push toward engaging the community, both in DH and in the wider circle of library technology, is meant to expand SHARE to include additional partners and more efficiently leverage contribution of library and institutional stakeholders.

Speakers
avatar for Cynthia Hudson-Vitale

Cynthia Hudson-Vitale

Data Services Coordinator and Research Transparency Librarian, Washington University St. Louis
Cynthia R. Hudson-Vitale is the Data Services Coordinator in Data & GIS Services at Washington University in St. Louis Libraries. In this position, Cynthia leads research data services and curation efforts for the Libraries. Since coming into this role in 2012, she has worked on faculty... Read More →
avatar for Rick Johnson

Rick Johnson

Program Director of Digital Initiatives and Scholarship, University of Notre Dame
avatar for Judy Ruttenberg

Judy Ruttenberg

Program Director for Strategic Initiatives, Association of Research Libraries
Judy Ruttenberg is primarily responsible for managing the SHARE initiative, which is building a free, open, data set about research and scholarly activities across their life cycle. While at ARL, Judy has also directed the Transforming Research Libraries initiative, which included... Read More →
JS

Jeffrey Spies

Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Virginia


Thursday April 12, 2018 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Harbor Room (3rd FL)

2:30pm

Fedora Forward: Vision, Strategy, and Product Roadmap
In 2012, Fedora stakeholders embarked on a three year mission to revitalize the Fedora project with a fresh codebase, new contributors, and an updated vision and strategic plan. Dubbed Fedora Futures, this effort culminated in the release of Fedora 4.0 in 2015 and the beginning of a new era of Fedora development. Now that this new version of Fedora has been in production for a few years, it is time to revisit and update the vision, strategic plan, and product roadmap based on lessons learned and future needs. To this end, the Fedora Leadership Group held a full-day meeting at the 2017 Fall CNI Membership Meeting to work on a revised vision and strategic plan that will inform the product roadmap for 2019 and beyond. This project update will present the results of this planning process and discuss the recent accomplishments and next steps for Fedora, including the publication of a formal API specification, the development of community implementations of the specification, the next major software release, and project direction going forward.

Speakers
avatar for Robin Ruggaber

Robin Ruggaber

Library Chief Technology Officer, University of Virginia
As the Chief Technical Officer for the University of Virginia Library, I am responsible for both IT strategy and operations. Further, I am committed to evolving digital stewardship, technologies and practices for Libraries, Archives and Museums and serve in strategic, advisory and... Read More →
avatar for David Wilcox

David Wilcox

Product Manager, DuraSpace
DuraSpace


Thursday April 12, 2018 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Plaza AB

2:30pm

RIALTO: Research Intelligence at Stanford
Like many universities, Stanford currently maintains separate systems for tracking researchers, grants and projects, with each overseen by and optimized for individual business concerns (research administration, human resources, finance, faculty affairs, etc.). Stanford also has no comprehensive system for tracking and managing its research output: the tangible artifacts of articles, data and other publications that advance human knowledge. In a cross-campus partnership to build a Research Information Ecosystem (RIE), the Stanford Libraries have begun development on a system, RIALTO, to systematically capture and relate research outputs to people, groups and projects. Working with the Dean of Research, School of Medicine, Office of International Affairs, University IT et al., the effort seeks to create an enterprise-wide scholarly graph, to feed other systems, and to equip the University with research intelligence that may inform decisions ranging from building library collections to grant compliance, from identifying new research opportunities to space planning for interdisciplinary facilities. This presentation will lay out the evolving interdepartmental and technical landscape for the RIE and RIALTO as they take form at Stanford, and explore the implications and opportunities for research institutions, funders, government agencies and the growing set of commercial providers in this space.

Speakers
avatar for Tom Cramer

Tom Cramer

Associate University Librarian, Stanford University
Blacklight, IIIF, Samvera, Fedora, VIVO, Research Intelligence, DuraSpace, linked data, Web Archiving, geospatial services, open source, community.


Thursday April 12, 2018 2:30pm - 3:15pm
California Ballroom AB

2:30pm

What the Data Tell Us: Analyzing the Use and Visibility of Open Access IR with the RAMP Dataset
The dataset compiled with the Repository Analytics & Metrics Portal (RAMP) is offering a new picture of use and visibility across institutional repositories (IR). The data suggest that IR offer significant value when optimized for search engines and when user activity is accurately reported. However, the IR community has been without a trusted analytics data source for making assessments that are comparable across institutions. Our research team developed RAMP as a free web service that has attracted 35 institutional subscribers in its first year of operation. In addition to improving analytics accuracy and serving as a diagnostic tool for IR performance, RAMP is generating a dataset that offers exciting analysis and research opportunities. In this session we present an overview of the analytics data sources available to IR managers, and we offer a preliminary analysis of some of the RAMP data collected to date. The data demonstrate: 1) a large variance in the use of IR content across repositories; 2) the representation of the open access IR academic record in Google search results; and 3) what part of the open access IR academic record users are accessing the most.

Speakers
avatar for Kenning Arlitsch

Kenning Arlitsch

Dean, Montana State University
PO

Patrick OBrien

Data Science Strategy & Solutions, Front Analytics


Thursday April 12, 2018 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Sierra AB

3:15pm

Break
Thursday April 12, 2018 3:15pm - 3:30pm
California Foyer

3:45pm

A Practical, Incremental Approach to a Decentralized Future
Decentralized and distributed technologies and protocols are being discussed as mechanisms by which to reconfigure scholarship (e.g., BitTorrent, blockchains, dat). Some of these have entered mainstream conversation and make daily appearances in the popular press (e.g., Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies). Often the main goal of implementing such technology, in scholarship as well as more generally, is by exploiting a feature of decentralization: increased robustness of a system should any individual component or player disappear. These goals are often paired with benefits to privacy, user and/or university ownership, identification, and long-term retention. All of these are good things. However, it is often assumed that these new technologies will simply fix scholarship's problems, without much consideration for user experience, side effects of the technology, resource costs, or the fact that some of these technologies have known and open challenges yet to be addressed. For example, can users currently conceptualize true immutability (i.e., it's never going away) such that they can responsibly use technologies that offer immutability? If they can't, how do we achieve similar goals related to that feature in a way that respects the user? This session will introduce several distributed and decentralized protocols and technologies, their core features, and known issues that could impact the efficacy of their implementations. It will also include descriptions of how the community might be able to capitalize upon some of their core features by making incremental investments that take into account known challenges and end-user experience. Several overarching questions will form the basis for most of this discussion: what are we trying to achieve, what problems are we trying to solve, and what is the most practical way to get there, sooner rather than later?

Speakers
JS

Jeffrey Spies

Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Virginia


Thursday April 12, 2018 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Sierra AB

3:45pm

Collaboration to Advance Open Scholarly Communication Infrastructure
The Elsevier acquisition of bepress has served as a wake-up call for the "open" scholarly communication community and is forcing us to rethink the balance of commercial and community players in the current system. This session brings together two key components in the academic community's pursuit of open scholarly communication, namely repository and publishing systems. The questions posed will be concerned with the current state of this infrastructure in terms of what the academic community has already developed, the extent to which these developments are open, and the need for developing additional parts and a much greater degree of interoperability among existing and potential parts. Those parts include repositories, journal and monograph publishing platforms, research information management systems, researcher bios, bibliographic systems, and so on. Using the audience-response software Poll Everywhere, the audience will be invited to comment on how greater coordination can be achieved in terms of (a) developing a coordinating body; (b) building plug-in capacities for interoperability and resource hand-off; (c) resolving differences in metadata standards across systems; and (d) demonstration integration projects.

John Willinsky of the Public Knowledge Project and Stanford University contributed significantly to the proposal of this project briefing.

Speakers
MJ

Mark Jordan

Head of Systems & Chair, Islandora Board of Directors, Simon Fraser University
DH

Debra Hanken Kurtz

CEO, DuraSpace
avatar for Brian Owen

Brian Owen

Associate Dean of Libraries & PKP Managing Director, SFU Library / Public Knowledge Project
Brian Owen is the Associate University Librarian for Technology Services and Special Collections at the SFU Library. He is also the Managing Director for the Public Knowledge Project (PKP) which is responsible for the development and support of Open Journal Systems (OJS) an open source... Read More →
KS

Kathleen Shearer

Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR)


Thursday April 12, 2018 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Plaza AB

3:45pm

It Takes a Village: Open Source Software Models of Collaboration & Sustainability - Themes and Future Directions
Why do some programs seem more successful than others? Why do some live on grants while some achieve community sustainability? What can we learn from other programs? In 2017, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) provided grant funding to enable LYRASIS to assess how open-source software programs serving cultural and scientific heritage organizations attain long-term sustainability. The project assumed that while there is no single approach to sustainability, there may be common threads among programs that would lead to common needs and strategies for meeting those needs. We developed a survey and conducted a two-day forum in Baltimore in the fall of 2017, during which representatives of over 25 OSS programs discussed project lifecycles, governance, financing, resources, community building, outreach and communications, and bumps in the road. The findings have been condensed into a guidebook to be shared with the larger community. This panel will provide an overview of the survey and forum, the overall themes that emerged, and use cases. It will include a discussion about potential next steps the community can take to further sustainability across open source programs.

Speakers
avatar for Laurie Gemmill Arp

Laurie Gemmill Arp

Director, Collections Services and Community Supported Software, LYRASIS
Laurie directs the ArchivesSpace & CollectionSpace programs,open source collection management software. She also directs training & consulting services. Previously, she worked at OCLC & the Ohio History Connection. She has degrees from UCLA, UCI and UCSD.
JH

John Herbert

Director of Digital Programs, LYRASIS
MK

Michele Kimpton

Director of Business Development and Senior Strategist, Digital Public Library of America



Thursday April 12, 2018 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Plaza C

3:45pm

Leaving the Teenage Years Behind: Internet Identity Comes of Age
Internet identity has been worked for a full generation now. Its importance has grown, creating new legal domains; its scope has grown, becoming as ubiquitous as the Internet itself; its vexations persist, from identity theft to privacy spills. This presentation will highlight significant markers on the path through the teenage years, but focus even more on the current activities that are marking both the transition of Internet identity to more maturity and the return of the cutting edge to its original roots in R&E. These activities include enabling new forms of discovery services, to the adoption of two-step authentication, responding to GDPR and PSD2 requirements, building user-effective fine-grain controls for attribute release and privacy management, federated incident handling, and increasing the basic baselines of trust within the community. The talk will conclude, as often, with a set of fearless and frequently wrong predictions.

Speakers
KK

Kenneth Klingenstein

Identity Evangelist, Internet2


Thursday April 12, 2018 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Santa Fe

3:45pm

Libraries, Information Equity, and Economic Justice
Academic libraries are cultural institutions with massive resource and operational footprints. By orienting our missions purposefully toward information and economic justice, we have the capacity to reshape the scholarly information landscape while positively impacting the ability of individual learners and researchers to traverse it. This briefing explores the capacity of libraries and allied institutions to leverage individual and collective action to reduce the inextricably linked information and economic inequalities our users face. The session will examine academic library practice through the lenses of information equity and economic justice, highlighting actions libraries and allied organizations can take in pursuit of increased resource parity and greater freedom from the entrenched information-for-profit systems that threaten our own budgets.

Speakers
avatar for Char Booth

Char Booth

Associate Dean of the University Library, California State University San Marcos
Char Booth is Associate Dean of the Library at CSU San Marcos and an ACRL Immersion Institute faculty member. Char’s work explores the intersection of pedagogy, advocacy, and design in libraries. Char was previously the Director of Research, Teaching, and Learning Services at the... Read More →


Thursday April 12, 2018 3:45pm - 4:45pm
California Ballroom AB

3:45pm

The Turn to Research Workflow and the Strategic Implications for the Academy
This session will provide an overview of the development of research workflow platforms, with an emphasis on the strategic implications for the academy. In many laboratory-based and quantitative science and social science fields, discovery of and access to the research literature has migrated largely to a platform-delivered, activity-tracked, analytics-enabled environment. Similar shifts to platforms and tracking are underway in these fields for other components of the researcher workflow, such as data gathering and analysis. In other fields, especially in the humanities, where research is structured around primary sources in a variety of non-quantitative formats and results tend to be reported in monographs rather than journals, online platforms that facilitate end-to-end workflow with activity tracking and analytics have been slow to emerge but are now becoming possible. In addition to the overview that we will provide of this differentiated structure, we hope to engage the audience in a vigorous discussion about the contributions that library leaders, CIOs, and university research executives can make to position their institutions strategically in this emerging dynamic.

Speakers
avatar for Roger C. Schonfeld

Roger C. Schonfeld

Director, Library and Scholarly Communication Program, Ithaka S+R
Roger is program director at Ithaka S+R. There, he leads strategic consulting, surveys, and other research projects, designed for academic libraries, publishers, and scholarly societies. Previously, Roger was a research associate at The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. He received degrees... Read More →
DW

Don Waters

Senior Program Officer, Scholarly Communications, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation


Thursday April 12, 2018 3:45pm - 4:45pm
California Ballroom C

3:45pm

University Futures, Library Futures: Aligning Library Services for Technology-enhanced Teaching, Learning and Research
Launched in March 2017, the University Futures, Library Futures project is examining how changes in the US higher education landscape are informing the organization and delivery of academic library services. As colleges and universities adapt to demographic change in undergraduate enrollment profiles, as well as evolving teaching, learning and research workflows, will academic libraries look increasingly similar or more diverse? How do shifts in institutional direction (e.g. an ambitious agenda to increase research productivity, dramatic growth in part-time enrollment, or a sharpened focus on improving retention and completion) impact the scope, scale and sourcing of library services? This session will present a research model, which is based on statistical indicators of US colleges and universities, and findings from focus groups with academic library leaders. The case of University Innovation Alliance (UIA) universities will be explored through the statistical research model, juxtaposing (1) the educational offer(s) that UIA universities lead with, (2) the mode(s) in which UIA universities provide their educational offer(s). Complementing this research perspective, a grounded view of how university futures shape library futures will be provided by Georgia State University. As a member of UIA, GSU has embarked on a bold strategy to increase retention and completion rates with a data-driven approach to maximizing student success. The University Library is an important partner in pioneering and scaling the educational enterprise at GSU, placing the student experience at the center of space and service planning.

The University Futures, Library Futures project is supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and is a collaboration between OCLC Research and Ithaka S+R.

Speakers
avatar for Constance Malpas

Constance Malpas

Strategic Intelligence Manager and Research Scientist, OCLC Research
Constance Malpas is Strategic Intelligence Manager & Research Scientist at OCLC (San Mateo, CA). Her research has focused on reconfiguration of academic print collections in the networked environment, especially the emergence of shared print preservation models; the impacts of emerging... Read More →
avatar for Jeff Steely

Jeff Steely

Dean of Libraries, Georgia State University
Jeff Steely is Dean of Libraries at Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia. Prior to arriving at Georgia State, Mr. Steely served as Associate Dean and Director of Central Libraries at Baylor University in Waco, Texas. Earlier positions at Baylor included Assistant Dean, Director... Read More →
RS

Rona Stein

Researcher, OCLC Research



Thursday April 12, 2018 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Harbor Room (3rd FL)

4:45pm

Break
Thursday April 12, 2018 4:45pm - 5:00pm
California Foyer

5:00pm

DH at SDSU: Modeling Library-Faculty Partnerships
San Diego State University (SDSU) is home to a growing digital humanities (DH) Initiative. What began as a grass-roots, faculty-led effort to explore the impact of digital technologies in research and teaching has grown into a campus-wide initiative and strategic "Area of Excellence." As an Area of Excellence with a unique focus on global diversity, DH@SDSU was awarded a faculty cluster hire and provided with start-up funds. SDSU Library & Information Access has been a partner in this initiative, receiving one of the first cluster hires (a new Digital Humanities Librarian) and developing a new Digital Humanities Center, which officially opened its doors in January 2018. In this project briefing, we will discuss the evolution of the campus initiative and the unique relationship between the library and the teaching faculty to create a space and set of programs to foster a community of digitally-engaged and curious faculty, staff, and students.

Speakers
PJ

Pamela Jackson

Popular Culture Librarian, San Diego State University
PL

Pamella Lach

Digital Humanities Librarian, San Diego State University
JP

Jessica Pressman

Associate Professor, English & Comparative Literature and Director, Digital Humanities Initiative, San Diego State University


Thursday April 12, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Harbor Room (3rd FL)

5:00pm

Dragging Researchers and their Data Into the Library
Researchers are producing data at an unprecedented rate. Once they publish, that data often gets tossed, lost or stored on a server under their desk. How do you bridge the gap between becoming a dumping ground for unstructured raw data and the place where you can collaborate with a research group to curate and distribute their data in our Digital Asset Management System? This session will cover how we set up a staging server with half a petabyte of capacity to capture research data and assist researchers and curators to collaborate on a shared platform. After working with over 20 different researchers and labs, it became perfectly clear that there isn't a one-size-fits-all solution. This session will discuss methods used to capture research data through an internet-based large file transfer service, to typical NFS/CIFS mounts, and the unexpected successes and challenges found therein.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Marconi

Tim Marconi

IT Operations Manager, University of California, San Diego
Storage, digital preservation and research data.



Thursday April 12, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Sierra AB

5:00pm

Email Archives: Issues, Tools, and Gaps
This session will report the work of the Task Force on Technical Approaches to Email Archives. With support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Digital Preservation Coalition, the Task Force spent the 18 months assessing technical frameworks, tools, and gaps concerning email collections. These materials are of high interest to scholars, students, and members of the public working in many subject areas. This session will focus on practical steps that libraries and archives are taking to support the acquisition, preservation, and accessibility of email collections, while also reviewing recommendations for future work and opportunities for cross-institutional collaboration.

Speakers
avatar for Kate Murray

Kate Murray

Digital Projects Coordinator, Library of Congress
Kate Murray is the Digital Projects Coordinator in the Digital Collections Management and Services at the Library of Congress where she leads the Federal Agencies Digital Guidelines Initiative (FADGI) Audio-Visual Working Group and the Sustainability of Digital Formats website. Prior... Read More →
avatar for Chris Prom

Chris Prom

Assistant University Archivist, Andrew S. G. Turyn Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Chris Prom is Assistant University Archivist and Andrew S. G. Turyn Professor at the Univeristy of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, as well as co-chair of the Task Force on Technical Approaches to Email Archives.


Thursday April 12, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
California Ballroom AB

5:00pm

English Hegemony and the Internet: Google, Wikipedia, and Libraries
This talk will be about the issue of linguistic diversity on the internet. The fact that most of the internet's content is accessible in only the most frequently spoken languages in the world is obviously an obstacle to universal freedom of access to information, but also for freedom of expression. Indeed, an opinion expressed in English has a much larger audience, and therefore more weight, than an opinion expressed in an uncommon native language. What are the facts and figures regarding these issues today? How can libraries and other public institutions contribute to linguistic diversity online?

Google Slides for this presentation: http://bit.ly/librarylanguage 
 


Speakers
avatar for Laurie Bridges

Laurie Bridges

Instruction and Outreach Librarian, Oregon State University
I work as a librarian at Oregon State University. I am on the IFLA FAIFE (Freedom of Access to Information and Freedom of Expression) Advisory Committee. Last summer at IFLA in Poland I gave a presentation similar to the one I will give at CNI - it was attended by almost 400 librarians... Read More →


Thursday April 12, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Plaza C

5:00pm

Neural Networks: Machine Vision for the Visual Archive
Although commonly used by commercial companies to process millions of images generated from smartphones, artificial neural networks have not yet seen wide adoption in the cultural heritage space. This talk examines how such "machine vision" techniques can be used to analyze and organize large visual collections with tens of thousands of images. The focus is on two practical use cases: Visual Similarity and Collection-Level Visualization. In addition, it explores the use of Generative Adversarial Networks in "forging" hitherto-unseen images from large digital collections, as well as this technique's possible role for artistic and interpretive purposes. All code shown is open-source and all examples are drawn from Yale libraries, museums, and galleries datasets.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Leonard

Peter Leonard

Director, Digital Humanities Lab, Yale University


Thursday April 12, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
California Ballroom C

5:00pm

Next Generation Repositories: New Functionalities and Technologies for Repositories
In November 2017, the COAR (Confederation of Open Access Repositories) Next Generation Repositories Working Group published "Behaviours and Technologies Recommendations for Next Generation Repositories." The vision underlying the work of "Next Generation Repositories" is "to position repositories as the foundation for a distributed, globally networked infrastructure for scholarly communication, on top of which layers of value-added services will be deployed, thereby transforming the system, making it more research-centric, open to and supportive of innovation, while also collectively managed by the scholarly community." The report describes 11 new behaviors for repositories and recommends a number of technologies, standards, and protocols for adoption in repository platforms. The aim is to both improve the discoverability of resources that are contained in repositories, as well as support the development of new services on top of their collective contents. There are already some initiatives working to implementing these recommendations in Europe and Japan. In the US, under the auspices of COAR, a group of institutions has launched a Next Generation Repositories Implementation Group. This session will present the technical recommendations from the report and also give an overview of current activities to implement the recommendations in the US and elsewhere.

Speakers
AB

Andrea Bollini

Chief Technology and Innovation Officer, 4Science
avatar for Kristi Holmes

Kristi Holmes

Director, Northwestern University / CD2H
Kristi is the director of Galter Health Sciences Library & Learning Center and associate professor of Preventive Medicine (Health & Biomedical Informatics) at Northwestern University. Her research is focused on the development and application of information standards to support interoperability... Read More →
KS

Kathleen Shearer

Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR)
avatar for Sarah Shreeves

Sarah Shreeves

Vice Dean, University of Arizona Libraries


Thursday April 12, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Imperial Room

5:00pm

Sunsetting: Strategies for Portfolio Management and Decommissioning Projects
Even successful projects and services result in maintenance needs that can take a significant amount of ongoing time and effort. How do we create time for new projects and initiatives? Shutting things down takes time and effort, but can allow you to go in new directions and meet current and emerging needs. As a community we talk about how to initiate successful projects and services, and we think now is a good time to talk more about these later stages of the project lifecycle: sunsetting and decommissioning. We will present strategies for decommissioning projects and greatly reducing this maintenance burden. We will share our approach to portfolio management for individuals and our department with an eye towards identifying candidate applications, initiatives, and services for sunsetting. Finally, we will discuss how these approaches have changed the way we approach new projects.

Speakers
BD

Bret Davidson

Associate Head, Digital Library Initiatives, North Carolina State University
avatar for Jason Ronallo

Jason Ronallo

Department Head, Digital Library Initiatives, NCSU Libraries


Thursday April 12, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Santa Fe

5:00pm

Using Linked Data for Research Findings in the Archaeology of Reading
The Archaeology of Reading (AOR) enables the systematic analysis of historical reading practices through the creation of a fully-searchable dataset consisting of tens of thousands manuscript annotations, all available in a digital research environment. Conducting research within the AOR resource has been likened to "falling down the rabbit hole": dynamic searches reveal new layers of information and enable scholars to traverse the AOR data in different ways. Through such scholarly activities, relationships are established between the various books in the overall AOR corpus and between the multiple annotations within these books. In order to retrace one's pathways through the data, the complex sequences of related findings need to be captured and stored. Moreover, our users should be able to export and publish their pathways, which are distinct research outputs in their own right. To achieve this ability, the Sheridan Libraries at Johns Hopkins University are using the RMap service to generate a set of linked data graphs ("DiSCOs"). For each research finding within AOR, defined as an ordered list of actions taken by the user which correspond to a viewer state, we are developing a capability for scholars to record their activities, view the research finding, minimally edit the finding, add metadata, and submit the finding to RMap for creation of relevant DiSCOs. This presentation represents the next stage of the Sheridan Libraries' ongoing work to develop digital humanities infrastructure.

Speakers
avatar for Sayeed Choudhury

Sayeed Choudhury

Associate Dean, Johns Hopkins University
JG

Jaap Geraerts

Research Associate, Centre for Editing Lives and Letters, University College London


Thursday April 12, 2018 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Plaza AB

5:30pm

Break
Thursday April 12, 2018 5:30pm - 5:45pm
California Foyer

5:45pm

Fostering Communities of Practice in Data Management
In the spring of 2017, Research Data Services (RDS) at the University of New Mexico (UNM) Libraries began a series of monthly workshops focused on integrating lifecycle data management concepts into common use cases for applications including Python, Pandoc, and the Unix shell. Originally developed as 'in-reach' to communicate corresponding RDS services to our library colleagues, the fall 2017 sessions were promoted to the broader UNM community with positive results. In particular, the sessions are well attended and an interdisciplinary community of practice has evolved among returning attendees. Sessions frequently surface specific data management needs of campus researchers in a relaxed setting which includes researchers, administrators, librarians, and research support personnel. Beyond the description and application of a handful of specific technologies, the Coffee and Code series has served to more strongly position the Libraries as a data management resource and has fostered departmental collaborations around the development of campus-wide services supporting data publishing and preservation, research information management, and compliance. In spring 2018 the series has expanded to include Coffee & Code presentations by UNM researchers outside of RDS and the library, along with a parallel set of workshops focused on more general conceptual issues including research data management, data management planning, workflow development, and documentation strategies. This project briefing will provide an overview of the drivers which motivated the series, the open source architecture of the workshops, and next steps for RDS and the Libraries as a whole.

Speakers
avatar for Karl Benedict

Karl Benedict

Director of Research Data Services, University of New Mexico
For nearly 30 years Karl Benedict has had parallel careers in Information Technology, Data Management and Analysis, and Archaeology. Over the last 22 years at UNM he has worked as a Graduate Student in Anthropology, Research Scientist, Applied Research Center Director, and currently... Read More →
JW

Jonathan Wheeler

Data Curation Librarian, University of New Mexico


Thursday April 12, 2018 5:45pm - 6:15pm
Sierra AB

5:45pm

Making Library Contributions Visible: The "Grants Menu" at UVic Libraries
The University of Victoria Libraries have developed a suite of services for grant funded projects in order to plainly articulate our competencies, assets, and constraints. This document acts as a "menu" of services from which researchers can select as they develop their grant applications. These include the use of our Fedora 4 digital asset management system, metadata expertise that extends to consultations around interoperability and linked data, web hosting and discovery, exhibit building software, copyright consultation, open access publishing, research data management, and digitization services. We include a break down of the in-kind value of each of these services, along with any costs that will be charged back, so that researchers can easily estimate the value of the institutional commitment. The grants "menu" is an appealing model for researchers, as it enables them to quickly understand the variety of services and in-kind contributions that the library can offer in order to strengthen a funding application. It underscores to administrators the library's value as a university research support. It helps to promote librarians as desirable co-applicants and collaborators on funding applications, and enables critical conversations about sustainability to happen during the grant writing process, rather than towards the end of funding cycles as has too often been the case in the past.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Goddard

Lisa Goddard

Associate University Librarian for Digital Scholarship and Strategy, University of Victoria
Lisa Goddard is the Associate University Librarian for Digital Scholarship and Strategy at University of Victoria Libraries. She holds degrees from Queen's, McGill, and Memorial University, and is currently completing an MA in Humanities Computing at the University of Alberta. Lisa's... Read More →


Thursday April 12, 2018 5:45pm - 6:15pm
California Ballroom C

5:45pm

Open Data as a Service in Special Collections Libraries; or, Let's Be Sure We're Better Than Data Brokers
Open data is a growing trend in archives and special collections. Now that the digitization of unique material is common, the reformatting of this material into data for computational analysis is gaining traction. This data allows new interactions with collection material, including mapping, text analysis, and a wide variety of visualizations. In addition to the new possibilities there are new risks. Using specific examples, this talk will explore the open data turn in special collections libraries, and will give special attention to concerns related to privacy and empathy.

Speakers
avatar for Scott Ziegler

Scott Ziegler

Head of Digital Programs and Services, Louisiana State University
I develop strategies for LSU Libraries’ digitization and preservation operations.


Thursday April 12, 2018 5:45pm - 6:15pm
Plaza C

5:45pm

Privacy in Cross-Border Preservation-based Partnerships
DuraSpace is pursuing an international partnership program to increase the geographic regions and languages where DuraCloud, an open source cloud storage and content preservation software, can be provided as a service and supported. In doing so, questions about information transfer, privacy, and legal jurisdiction of the partnership and preservation activities arose. It prompted legal research and consultation by DuraSpace related to international privacy legislation, namely the Canadian Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act and European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), in relation to the U.S. Patriot Act and Mutual Legal Assistance Treaties (MLATs). This presentation will share the research and consultation outcomes as well as gauge participant's experiences and additional areas of interest.

Speakers
avatar for Erin Tripp

Erin Tripp

Executive Director, DuraSpace
As the Executive Director of DuraSpace, Erin provides strategic leadership and vision for DuraSpace initiatives, partnerships, and hosted services. She works in collaboration with academic, scientific, cultural, technology, and research communities toward the stewardship of community-supported... Read More →


Thursday April 12, 2018 5:45pm - 6:15pm
Santa Fe

5:45pm

Supporting 3D/VR Technologies in Academic Libraries: Curation and Preservation Challenges
This presentation discusses work being conducted at University of Oklahoma (OU) Libraries to develop strategies and best practices for supporting 3D/VR (virtual reality) technologies in research and instruction. Since January 2016, OU Libraries has deployed a network of VR workstations across campus and successfully integrated 3D/VR tools into courses and research applications in diverse fields such as architecture, structural biology, anthropology, and medical imaging. These successes demonstrate the potential for VR to enhance spatial thinking, visual literacy, and embodied information acquisition in a variety of contexts. Along with these new academic potentials of 3D/VR emerge new challenges, including how to properly document and manage 3D data throughout the research lifecycle and how to support complex configurations of hardware and software as they change over time. This presentation will draw on real-world experiences of deploying 3D/VR in research and teaching to suggest some strategies and future directions for 3D/VR implementation. It will also discuss initial findings drawn from a colloquium on the topic of 3D/VR curation held at OU Libraries in March 2018.

Speakers
ZL

Zack Lischer-Katz

CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow in Data Curation, University of Oklahoma


Thursday April 12, 2018 5:45pm - 6:15pm
Harbor Room (3rd FL)

5:45pm

The Espy Project: Enabling New Access to Archival Materials
UAlbany's M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections & Archives is developing a digital repository for both archival description and digital content that will make its collections usable to a broad audience. This involves connecting implementations of major open source projects, such as ArchivesSpace and Samvera, over APIs to deliver archival material in ways that are now comfortable and familiar on the web. The impetus for the project is a CLIR Digitizing Hidden Collections grant to facilitate computational research on capital punishment with the M. Watt Espy Papers.

Speakers

Thursday April 12, 2018 5:45pm - 6:15pm
Imperial Room

5:45pm

The UC Merced LibraryCAVE: Programming to Support Teaching and Research
The University of California (UC) Merced LibraryCAVE (Cave Automated Virtual Environment) is a large-scale 3D immersive environment designed expressly for engaging teaching, learning, and research to support the mission of UC Merced. As a part of the UC Catalyst Grant Project, the LibraryCAVE enables members of the community to experience at-risk cultural heritage first-hand. Since its inception, the UC Merced LibraryCAVE has integrated classroom teaching and student research using 3D technology, but it has also been used as a development tool, whereby demonstrations are used to attract potential donors. To support these activities, a Docent Guide Program has been established to teach undergraduate students how to operate the LibraryCAVE system and to support the Wide Area Visualization Environment (WAVE), a massive VR installation. These students will be trained to interpret cultural heritage, scientific, engineering and other content, so that they can speak authoritatively on the 2D and 3D content presented in the LibraryCAVE, as well as provide users and visitors with background on the technology and content creation process. The Docent Guide program provides undergraduates with a unique opportunity to learn about the research and scholarship associated with the installations, as well as hone their public presentation skills and have fun exploring the content. This presentation will discuss how the LibraryCAVE is used as a learning and research tool both inside and outside the classroom, and how it demonstrates the changing role of academic libraries.

Speakers
HL

Haipeng Li

University Librarian, University of California, Merced
JW

Jeffrey Weekley

Director of Cyberinfrustructure & Research Computing, University of California, Merced


Thursday April 12, 2018 5:45pm - 6:15pm
California Ballroom AB

5:45pm

Turning Threads into Cloth: The Library's Role in Unifying, Enhancing, and Disseminating Research Information
In 2017, the McMaster University Library initiated and led the implementation of VIVO software to represent the University's faculty members and their scholarship in an open and semantic web-enabled format. Operating in an environment where research information was predominantly decentralized and discordant, the project team faced significant challenges in harmonizing information and building institution-wide support for its centralization. By implementing a campus-wide Research Information Management System (RIMS), the project team (and therefore the Library) provided a means of compiling the institution's research information in a standardized format and then harvesting it for display in VIVO, as well as making it available for reuse by all interested campus groups. Through this work, the Library has established itself as a campus leader and authority in research information and identity management and has strengthened its relationships with groups across the institution. As the project transitions to a mature production phase, the team faces challenges associated with increasing adoption of its systems and scaling functionality in a sustainable manner to meet the requirements of various user groups. In this project briefing, we'll outline the implementation process, discuss the challenges that were identified and overcome, and provide recommendations for other libraries seeking to develop similar solutions.

Speakers
avatar for Dale Askey

Dale Askey

Vice Provost and Chief Librarian, University of Alberta
JB

Jason Brodeur

Associate Director, Digital Scholarship Services, McMaster University Library


Thursday April 12, 2018 5:45pm - 6:15pm
Plaza AB

6:15pm

Reception
Thursday April 12, 2018 6:15pm - 7:30pm
Garden Terrace/SD Ballroom (4th FL)
 
Friday, April 13
 

7:30am

Breakfast
Friday April 13, 2018 7:30am - 8:45am
Garden Terrace/SD Ballroom (4th FL)

9:00am

AMP: An Audiovisual Metadata Platform to Support Mass Description
In recent years, concern over the longevity of physical audio and video (AV) formats due to media degradation and obsolescence, combined with decreasing cost of digital storage, have led libraries and archives to embark on projects to digitize recordings for purposes of long-term preservation and improved access. Beyond digitization, in order to facilitate discovery and research use, AV materials must also be described, but many items and collections lack sufficient metadata. In 2015, with the support of consulting firm AVP, the Indiana University Libraries conducted a planning project to research, analyze, and report on technologies, workflows, staffing, timeline and budgets to address the challenge of quickly and efficiently creating large quantities of metadata for mass-digitized AV collections. One of the outcomes of this planning project was identification of a need for a technology platform to support the incremental application of both automated and human-based processes to create and augment metadata. With support from a Mellon Foundation planning grant, Indiana University has partnered with experts from the University of Texas at Austin School of Information and AVP to explore the design of a software platform to support the incremental application of automated and human-based processes to create and augment metadata at large scales for AV collections. In this session, we will describe the proposed technical architecture for this system, dubbed the Audiovisual Metadata Platform (or AMP), discuss the use cases and technical considerations that informed its design, and discuss next steps toward implementation and pilot testing.

Speakers
avatar for Jon W. Dunn

Jon W. Dunn

Assistant Dean for Library Technologies, Indiana University
AA

AVP: Aviary Platform

President, AVP
AVP's cloud-based Aviary is the first-of-its-kind audiovisual publishing & access platform with a focus on enhanced search & navigation. Synchronized AV & metadata allows users to search & find exactly what they are looking for quickly. Granular permissions enables content holders... Read More →


Friday April 13, 2018 9:00am - 9:45am
Imperial Room

9:00am

Assessing the Impact of the Library in the Research Ecosystem
Libraries play an increasingly comprehensive role in the research lifecycle, yet metrics and measures (both qualitative and quantitative) that illustrate the fundamental role and impact of the library in research still need to be developed. Research libraries need first to define the values by which they want to be measured, rather than trying to manifest those values from the data that they have traditionally collected. To this end, the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) underwent a visioning process for its assessment program between February and October 2017. The goal of this project was to develop a forward-looking program that advances the organizational outcomes of the 21st century research library. One result of the visioning process was a clearly elaborated need for research libraries to demonstrate their function in advancing and collaborating in the research enterprise. Rather than trying to define "impact" and "value" independently, the new ARL assessment program will set the context for understanding and communicating the stories of the research library to external stakeholders and provide the tools for members to tell this story locally. At the heart of this work is a framework that aims to draw a map of the landscape of services and functions provided across all research libraries. The comprehensive framework, and proposed new data points, will help research libraries translate their values into measures. The presenters will demonstrate how this collaboratively developed (and evolving) framework paints a map of the research library assessment landscape and how it will be used to understand and measure the role of the library in supporting institutional missions.

Speakers
avatar for Sue Baughman

Sue Baughman

Deputy Executive Director, Association of Research Libraries
avatar for Megan Hurst

Megan Hurst

Chief Experience Officer, Athenaeum21
I co-founded Athenaeum21 with Christine Madsen to help libraries, museums, publishers and knowledge organizations evolve, innovate, and lead our information age. My areas of expertise and passion are user experience, user research, digital strategy, assessment, digital humanities... Read More →
avatar for Christine Madsen

Christine Madsen

Chief Innovation Officer, Athenaeum21
Dr Christine Madsen works at the intersection of libraries and technology. She is expert in building large-scale systems that use technology to connect researchers, teachers, and students with library and learning resources. She is interested in understanding and building the library... Read More →


Friday April 13, 2018 9:00am - 9:45am
Sierra AB

9:00am

Developing and Scaling Research Data Management and Curation
Academic libraries have been expanding their research data services in response to growing expectations that research data should be well managed, openly available, reproducible, and FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable). This presentation will provide an overview of how the Duke University Libraries and the University of Minnesota Libraries have scaled up research data management and curation services to better serve our communities. Background on the foundations of Duke's initiative through engagement with the Provost and faculty, funding and staffing models, current curation workflows, and lessons learned will be discussed. Next steps will also be presented including Duke's plans to join the Data Curation Network (DCN), which enables academic libraries to collectively, and more effectively, curate a wider variety of data types (e.g., discipline, file format, etc.) that expands beyond what any single institution might offer alone. Minnesota's research data services program initiation and growth will be discussed, along with an overview of the Data Curation Network's genesis, goals, and first year activities. Supported by a planning grant from the Arthur P. Sloan foundation, the DCN conducted researcher engagement activities at each of the six original partner institutions and iteratively developed a model for distributed data curation. The Data Curation Network members are University of Minnesota (lead), Cornell University, Duke University, Dryad, Johns Hopkins University, Penn State University, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of Michigan, and Washington University-St. Louis.

Speakers
JD

Jennifer Darragh

Research Data Management Consultant, Duke University
avatar for Sophia Lafferty-Hess

Sophia Lafferty-Hess

Research Data Management Consultant, Duke University
avatar for Timothy M. McGeary

Timothy M. McGeary

Associate University Librarian for Digital Strategies and Technology, Duke University
avatar for Claire Stewart

Claire Stewart

Associate University Librarian for Research and Learning, University of Minnesota
data management, scholarly communication, digital scholarship, research impact, active learning, learning analytics, digital media, academic learning support, space planning, learning spaces


Friday April 13, 2018 9:00am - 9:45am
California Ballroom AB

9:00am

Enhancing the Institutional Repository: Increasing Access to Academic Articles and Manuscripts through Integration of Publisher APIs
This project briefing will provide an update to our institutional repository (IR) pilot project with Elsevier to maximize visibility, impact, and dissemination of articles by University of Florida (UF) researchers who have published in Elsevier journals. The briefing will include a brief overview of our earlier phases of the pilot projects that included working with Elsevier APIs to embed and deliver published versions of UF-authored articles to IR@UF users. The pilot further implemented full-text searching of these articles with links to both open access and subscription articles for users from both within and from outside of the UF academic community. This pilot aims to aid in discoverability and to facilitating compliance with US policies on public access to federally funded research. Through this integration, access to the full text of these articles is available for all IR users that are affiliated with a ScienceDirect subscribing institution. We are currently in the final phase of this pilot, which includes embedding metadata and links to accepted manuscripts available on ScienceDirect into the IR@UF. These accepted manuscripts are then available to users without subscription access to the final published articles. This briefing will conclude by reviewing the challenges we faced in adapting our institutional repository's user interface to incorporate publisher provided content.

Speakers
avatar for Todd Digby

Todd Digby

Chair, Library Technology Services, University of Florida
Todd Digby is the Chair of Library Technology Services at the University of Florida. In this position, Todd leads a service oriented department that researches, develops, optimizes and supports advanced library information systems and technology for the University of Florida Libraries... Read More →


Friday April 13, 2018 9:00am - 9:45am
Plaza C

9:00am

Limitations on Access: The Independent Scholar and Lifelong Learner
The vast majority of university students are at peak lifetime access to scholarly resources. After graduation, despite some alumni provisions and public library efforts, their access to indices, databases, and content platforms shrinks substantially. In past generations, before the digital transformation, the differences were less dramatic. Many university libraries would offer walk-in access to users, with all the wealth of their print collections and catalogs available for use. Today, we expect point-of-need access to information resources, not to have to schedule time to visit a library. And, perhaps more importantly, even when going to a welcoming library, many resources are locked behind computers or wifi that require a login. Is this a crisis for the independent scholar and lifelong learner?

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Hare

Sarah Hare

Scholarly Communication Librarian, Indiana University
As Scholarly Communication Librarian, Sarah Hare (formerly Crissinger) collaborates with subject librarians, the IU Press, and Library Technologies to educate and advise the campus community on open access and related issues. She also serves as liaison to IU’s Office of Scholarly... Read More →
avatar for Cecilia Preston

Cecilia Preston

Researcher
avatar for Roger C. Schonfeld

Roger C. Schonfeld

Director, Library and Scholarly Communication Program, Ithaka S+R
Roger is program director at Ithaka S+R. There, he leads strategic consulting, surveys, and other research projects, designed for academic libraries, publishers, and scholarly societies. Previously, Roger was a research associate at The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. He received degrees... Read More →


Friday April 13, 2018 9:00am - 9:45am
Plaza AB

9:00am

Preservation: An Opinionated Approach
Institutions are faced with several choices when making technology decisions related to the dove-tailing issues of preservation, storage, and repositories: cloud vs. local, off-the-shelf vs. DIY (do-it-yourself), complete systems vs. individual components. Constantly bombarded with slick sales pitches, "expert" recommendations, echoes from pre-digital practices, and field-wide fashions, executive-level decision makers as well as on-the-ground practitioners struggle to be properly informed when making technology decisions. This talk will present a series of guiding principles and a list of recommendations that, taken together, form a coherent strategy for informed decision making when it comes to selecting digital asset management and preservation solutions. Topics discussed include: Should preservation be a part of storage? Should preservation be a part of repositories? How do professional standards both help and hinder preservation efforts? And: Can we address all of our needs with one single product?

Speakers
TH

Tom Hutchinson

Web Developer, Tri-College Libraries: Bryn Mawr, Haverford, and Swarthmore Colleges


Friday April 13, 2018 9:00am - 9:45am
Santa Fe

9:00am

Prototyping a Linked Data Platform for Production Cataloging Workflows
Cornell University and the University of California, Davis have joined OCLC in joint research project prototyping a new suite of linked data services. This unique project uses the out-of-the-box services from WikiBase and a high-quality set of name entities available from FAST, VIAF, and Wikidata to prototype services to 1) reconcile names for people, organizations, concepts, places, and events against an index based on entities, returning language-tagged headings and persistent identifiers; and 2) create, edit, and share and edit entity descriptions while also allowing for the contribution of additional contextual relationships between entities, beyond those that can be found by mining structured data in bibliographic and authority data. This briefing will cover: the implementation and scalability of the Wikibase technology, as well as insights into the partnership with the Wikibase community; analysis of the improved reconciliation of legacy bibliographic data to linked data entities; discussion of the efficacy and efficiency of introducing linked data tools in metadata management workflows; use cases driving development and potential production implementation of the tools.

Speakers
avatar for Jason Kovari

Jason Kovari

Director, Cataloging and Metadata Services, Cornell University
Cornell University
avatar for Andrew Pace

Andrew Pace

Executive Director, Technical Research, OCLC Research
Andrew leads a team of research scientists, architects, and engineers who track library and broader data science trends and is responsible for building a coordinated R&D strategy for OCLC Research. Previously, he directed the development of the WorldShare Platform, WorldShare Management... Read More →



Friday April 13, 2018 9:00am - 9:45am
Harbor Room (3rd FL)

9:00am

The Digital Library of Medieval Manuscripts: New Directions in Scholarship
In this presentation, we will examine how the technological developments of the Digital Library of Medieval Manuscripts (DLMM) are encouraging new kinds of research into the literature, art, and history of 14th and 15th-century France. Designed and implemented by the Sheridan Libraries at Johns Hopkins University, the DLMM incorporates digitized images and research materials related to some of the most important literary figures of medieval Europe. Further to our demonstration of the technology behind the DLMM, at the December 2017 CNI meeting, this presentation will focus on the scholarly outcomes enabled by that technology, showing how we have bridged between programming and research considerations to further the aims of our user community. Drawing on feedback and accounts from our network of stakeholders, we will show how the incorporation of a IIIF viewer has engendered different ways of posing scholarly questions, potentially leading us to a deeper understanding of the culture of that era.

Speakers
TM

Tamsyn Mahoney-Steel

Digital Scholarship Specialist, Johns Hopkins University


Friday April 13, 2018 9:00am - 9:45am
California Ballroom C

9:45am

Break
Friday April 13, 2018 9:45am - 10:00am
California Foyer

10:15am

A Data Architecture Framework for Library Collections
At the 2017 CNI Spring Meeting, Clifford Lynch summarized the struggle of academic institutions "...trying to disentangle a set of demands for various types of digital collection management of platforms from things we traditionally think of as repositories." Lynch discussed how this struggle leads to the key question of "whether an institution should try to have one platform that they use for all digital collections or whether they use separate ones for different types of content."

At the University of Connecticut (UConn), we took this question and stood it on its heads. Instead of starting with a consideration of technology platforms, we examined the preservation, management, and access characteristics and requirements of the digital content in our collections and built a data architecture framework that is informing the re-development of our digital content management landscape. This landscape includes all digital content the library collects, from reformatted and born-digital cultural heritage to scholarly output and data sets, licensed resources, and locally and remotely controlled information resources. In this session, we will present UConn's data architecture framework and illustrate how we are using it to examine our collections and our technology systems.

Speakers
PL

Patrick L. Carr

Associate University Librarian for Collections & Discovery, University of Connecticut
avatar for Greg Colati

Greg Colati

Associate University Librarian, Archives, Special Collections and Digital Curation, University of Connecticut
Digital Libraries, Digital repositories, Scholarly Communications Design.


Friday April 13, 2018 10:15am - 11:00am
Plaza C

10:15am

A Data Sharing Model for Decentralized Research Data Management
Research data management (RDM) has primarily focused on software infrastructure in the form of repositories or other relatively centralized data platforms. However, research workflows around data are very dynamic, reflecting the continuously evolving needs of researchers, and it is difficult for conventional platforms to engage fully with the varied range of workflows. Researchers often do not make extensive use of data repositories which they could otherwise benefit from. In essence, there is a conceptual and technical "gap" between research and RDM infrastructures. This talk proposes an alternative approach, beginning from the perspective of researcher needs for data sharing, considered in a broad sense, and relating them to data sharing in the RDM context. This is expressed in a new model which combines communication, curation, and integration of data into a single lightweight service. The main purpose of the model is to unify different levels of data management and promote flexible collaboration around open data. The approach also focuses on how to achieve simplicity of deployment and integration of the model with researcher tools, which are already integrated into research workflows, as well as with repositories. This amounts to an interoperability layer for data sharing and other decentralized RDM functions. Compared to conventional platforms, the decentralized approach is more flexible and has a number of benefits. It can be deployed in situ where data are stored, extending the reach of RDM to data outside of repositories. Integration with existing researcher tools, and the data integration function that is provided, together promote the use of data curation very early in the lifecycle, when knowledge about data is most readily accessible. An open source reference implementation has been developed, and it is demonstrated with examples based on environmental sensor data. These examples show how the proposed model simplifies data sharing, its benefits and effectiveness, and how it can help to support a more engaging and fruitful partnership between research and library communities.

Speakers
NN

Nassib Nassar

Index Data


Friday April 13, 2018 10:15am - 11:00am
Plaza AB

10:15am

Creating a FOLIO-based Integrated Library System
Since 2016, the FOLIO community of librarians, designers, developers, service providers, and vendors, led by EBSCO, the OLE Partners, and Index Data, has been working together to develop a new open source library services platform (LSP). The first major application of that platform will be a new integrated library system (ILS), currently being created through the work of over 60 application/UX developers and over 100 library functional experts. Release of a fully functional FOLIO-based ILS is scheduled for the second half of 2018, with initial beta-partner implementations planned by the end of this year. Four OLE Partners, Cornell, Lehigh, Texas A&M, and University of Chicago, are planning to implement in July 2019. In this project briefing, we will provide an overview of the full FOLIO partnership; a status report and timeline for the implementation of the ILS modules; a brief walk-through of the look and feel of the system; a look under the hood at how the platform serves to coordinate all the elements of the ILS and integrate with external services; and a brief exploration of how community members are already stretching the platform beyond the traditional boundaries of an ILS. We will also describe how interested libraries, service providers, and vendors can join the FOLIO community, and the resources that will be available to enable them to implement or integrate with FOLIO and the new ILS.

Speakers
avatar for Sebastian Hammer

Sebastian Hammer

President, Index Data
Co-founder of Index Data. Passionate about interoperable systems and collaborative software projects. I have worked with library technology for the better part of three decades.
avatar for Dean B. Krafft

Dean B. Krafft

Chief Technology Strategist, Cornell University
I'm working on a number of projects: ILS replacement, Linked Data for Libraries, VIVO, campus IT models, web archiving, Hydra, and IIIF, among others.


Friday April 13, 2018 10:15am - 11:00am
Sierra AB

10:15am

Encouraging Convergence in the Libraries: Intersections of Data Science and Digital Humanities through Grassroots Collaboration
As scholars embark on new modes of scholarship, they are driving a demand for new skills and services. These new skills are increasingly digital, requiring expertise in areas not "traditionally" considered in the library wheelhouse, like data mining, textual analysis, spatial analysis, visualization, or 3D modeling. At the University of Arizona Libraries, we are hiring experts and partnering with campus units to develop services and position the libraries as the natural hub for digital scholarship and data science. In marrying these traditionally separate domains, we are enabling outreach and support across all disciplines, and facilitating training based on skills and tools to reach broad audiences. For example, we provide workshops and drop-in assistance with R programming, geospatial data, virtual reality content development, data management, and multimodal publishing, seeking to continually iterate on the content provided. This presentation will discuss how we work with faculty across STEM, humanities, and social sciences to integrate digital scholarship support into the curriculum, and our collaboration with CyVerse on Software and Data Carpentry workshops. We will also discuss the organizational development and cultural adjustment necessary to provide these services as a unified portfolio.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer T. Nichols

Jennifer T. Nichols

Digital Scholarship Librarian, University of Arizona
Digital ScholarshipMakerspacesDiverse and inclusive spaces and eventsDigital Humanities
avatar for Erin O'Meara

Erin O'Meara

Digital Preservation Services Manager, Artefactual Systems
JC

Jeffrey C. Oliver

Data Science Specialist, University of Arizona


Friday April 13, 2018 10:15am - 11:00am
Harbor Room (3rd FL)

10:15am

Heard of DevOps? Find Out How this Methodology Can Accelerate Your Ability to Launch New and More Engaging Library/Museum Exhibitions
The DevOps methodology is a term that was initially coined 10 years ago to describe a culture that brings together software development and operations and results in code releases that are highly scalable, very reliable and totally reusable. The methodology can also be used in managing the content that is displayed as part of the exhibition. As a result, this methodology is gaining increasing usage in support of library/museum based exhibitions which tend to have very defined lifespans, need to spin up and down quickly, and evolve throughout their lifespan. In addition, library/museum based exhibitions are growing in number and represent a unique opportunity to leverage artifacts and collections of the organizations and, when coupled with the latest technology, create engaging exhibitions that are comprised of both analog and state-of-the-art digital components.

This presentation looks at how the University of Oklahoma has begun utilizing the DevOps methodology and will compare two exhibitions, one which used DevOps and one which did not, in order to show the difference this methodology can make. Lessons learned will be shared so that you can optimize your ability to collaborate on, and rapidly launch, shared and engaging exhibitions.

Speakers
avatar for Twila Camp

Twila Camp

Senior Director of Digital Innovation and Development, University of Oklahoma
As the Senior Director of the Digital Innovation and Development Division, Twila supports the libraries major strategic pillars by providing leadership for library technology, services, and platforms. This division also provides critical support for researchers seeking grants by offering... Read More →
avatar for Carl Grant

Carl Grant

Interim Dean of University Libraries & CTO, OU Libraries


Friday April 13, 2018 10:15am - 11:00am
Santa Fe

10:15am

NCSU Libraries Digital and Data Science Skills Workshops: Building Capacity and Meeting Campus Needs
Over the past two years, the North Carolina State University (NCSU) Libraries has significantly expanded the number and nature of workshops it provides the university community, from 55 sessions to over 400, reaching more than 6,000 users. These workshops address an unmet need for instruction around emerging technical skills including data science, visualization, virtual reality, digital media production, fabrication, and the research enterprise. While this programming is still new, our data show that the demand extends across campus, drawing participants from over 80 campus units. This presentation will describe how this programming was developed to address the goals of bolstering student success through a discussion of specific workshop content, focusing specifically on the highly successful Data Visualization Workshop series. In addition, we will describe our efforts in scaling up our workshop offerings through the Peer Scholars Program, which gives graduate students and postdoctoral scholars the opportunity to share their expertise and teach advanced research skills to the NC State community.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Garrett

Jennifer Garrett

Head of Digital Research Education & Training, North Carolina State University


Friday April 13, 2018 10:15am - 11:00am
California Ballroom C

10:15am

PLACE: Exposing Cultural Heritage Collections through Geospatial Search
The University of New Hampshire Library and Earth Systems Research Center built PLACE (the Position-based Location Archive Coordinate Explorer), a project to link the Library's Fedora digital collections repository with an open source geospatial search interface. Adding geographic coordinate metadata to digital objects increases the range of discovery options available for this content, including integration with geospatial search tools, and exposes this content to new audiences. Through PLACE, via a click or delineation of a search polygon on a web map, users can zoom to a region to locate digital collections texts and images whose geographic extents intersect. This presentation will provide an overview of the project and the resources created by it. PLACE was funded in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, Grant Award Number: LG-05-13-0350-13.

Speakers
avatar for Eleta Exline

Eleta Exline

Head of Technology, Scholarship, and Publishing Division, University of New Hampshire



Friday April 13, 2018 10:15am - 11:00am
Imperial Room

10:15am

PRESQT: Assessing Researcher and Library Needs for Research Data & Software Preservation Quality Tools
Information gathered during the past year's PRESQT workshops and needs assessment survey will be presented in this session. With planning grant funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the University of Notre Dame's Hesburgh Libraries and Center for Research Computing coordinated a year-long outreach effort with dedicated participation from the Center of Open Science (COS) and collaboration from many other academic, publishing, and software development stakeholders to address gaps in these communities towards consistently preserving research data and software. The planning process explored how to better represent digital workflow methodologies, improve data and software provenance, automatically enhance metadata, perform schema validation, improve file format recognition, interoperability, data integrity and ultimately facilitate reproducibility. Tool needs and development priorities identified through the needs assessment will be presented and will be of interest to library and information system stakeholders, user communities and tool providers.

Speakers
avatar for Rick Johnson

Rick Johnson

Program Director of Digital Initiatives and Scholarship, University of Notre Dame
avatar for Natalie Meyers

Natalie Meyers

E-Research Librarian, University of Notre Dame
Ms Meyers is an E-Research librarian in Digital Initiatives and Scholarship where she helps pioneer and provide research data consulting services, including more in-depth data management services in support of grant-funded research.Devotes up to 80% of her time as an embedded e-research... Read More →
avatar for Zheng (John) Wang

Zheng (John) Wang

Associate University Librarian, University of Notre Dame
Zheng (John) Wang is Associate University Librarian for Digital Access, Resources, and Information Technology at the University of Notre Dame. He provides leadership and guidance and manages vision and strategies in the development and optimization of library systems and applications... Read More →


Friday April 13, 2018 10:15am - 11:00am
California Ballroom AB

11:00am

Break
Friday April 13, 2018 11:00am - 11:15am
California Foyer

11:15am

Discuss Data: Open Platform for the Interactive Discussion of Research Data Quality (on the Example of Area Studies on the Post-Soviet Region)
With Discuss Data the Research Centre for East European Studies at the University of Bremen and the Göttingen State and University Library are currently creating an interactive online platform for the discussion of research data and their quality assessment. The aim is to create a place of academic communication for the community-specific curation, annotation and discussion of research data. Discuss Data will serve as a layer between distributed repositories and scholars. For data storage and digital long-term preservation, it will be connected to the DARIAH-DE repository and, prospectively, the Humanities Data Centre services. Through cross-linkage with various external data sources, knowledge and debates regarding research data shall be collected interactively and made accessible to both the academic community and the interested public. The VRE (virtual research environment) will thereby contribute to the creation of a project-independent, transregional and sustainable information infrastructure. The novelty of the project lies in the approach to enable active discussions on research data as a collective procedure in an accessible web-based infrastructure.

Speakers
JB

Jan Brase

Head of Research & Development, Göttingen State and University Library
WH

Wolfram Horstmann

Director, Göttingen State and University Library


Friday April 13, 2018 11:15am - 11:45am
California Ballroom AB

11:15am

From Platform to Services: Extending UC's Research Hub and Aggregating Utilities that Support the Research Lifecycle
In 2015, the University of Cincinnati (UC) shared its experiences at CNI on the implementation of an ecosystem focused on research, scholarship, knowledge management and administration (Research Hub @ UC). Two key components, UC's Research Directory and Scholar@UC, were designed to support researchers, faculty, administrators and institutional partners by providing a platform and set of services that streamline processes, automate data collection and management procedures, facilitate collaboration initiatives and provide rich data for analysis and forecasting. This year, we are integrating the two environments as well as releasing a new ecosystem (CORE) that aggregates multiple services for faculty and administrators and potential partners. CORE provides enhanced visualizations and dynamically driven utilities that support multiple aspects of the research lifecycle from ideation to creation. One use case is enhancing collection development and liaison services based on harvesting and analyzing faculty profiles. Collection development librarians rely heavily on their relationships with faculty and understanding of necessary materials in their subject areas to guide their collection practices, but this process can be time consuming and challenging especially with staff reductions and increasing responsibilities. To make the process more effective and efficient, we created an API to harvest faculty research interest and publication history in the Research Directory. The UC Research Scholarship ecosystem continues to evolve as needs grow at all levels. Leveraging the strong partnership between UC Libraries, UCIT and Research, we will continue to expand integrations, micro-services and macro subsystems. This presentation is an update on UC's Research Scholarship ecosystem and highlights latest developments in the suite of services.

Speakers
avatar for May Chang

May Chang

Library CTO, University of Cincinnati
KP

Keloni Parks

Reference Librarian, The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County
avatar for Josette Riep

Josette Riep

Associate Director Innovation & Partnerships, Software Development, University of Cincinnati


Friday April 13, 2018 11:15am - 11:45am
Plaza AB

11:15am

Launching the Digital Research Commons at the University of Houston Libraries
Over at least the last decade, scholarship has predominantly originated in digital formats. Scholars, researchers, and students are therefore increasingly in need of skills related to digital tools and methodologies (particularly in the digital humanities), data literacy and manipulation, data management, and data archiving and preservation. Libraries, traditionally well suited to assisting users with many of these topics in analog formats, are now playing larger, more active roles in the digital environment. One growing approach is the provision of digital scholarship services and centers. This project briefing outlines the planning and early implementation of one such center at the University of Houston Libraries. In this project briefing, presenters will: (a) address the methodologies used to formulate two core strategies for the establishment of the Digital Research Commons (DRC), a digital scholarship roadmap for the Libraries and an implementation plan for the DRC; (b) describe the development of the physical facility; (c) outline expertise and initial programming and services offered in the DRC; and (d) discuss the early lessons learned when implementing the DRC, particularly when key planning activities took place before the hiring of a DRC director. The presentation will conclude by reflecting on the opportunities and challenges of developing the DRC concurrently with the creation and implementation of the Libraries' strategic plan.

Speakers
avatar for Santi Thompson

Santi Thompson

Head, Digital Research Services, University of Houston
Santi Thompson is the Head of Digital Research Services at the University of Houston (UH) Libraries. In this role, he develops policies and workflows for the digital components of scholarly communications, including digital research support and digital repositories. Santi publishes... Read More →
CW

Claude Willan

Director, Digital Research Commons, University of Houston


Friday April 13, 2018 11:15am - 11:45am
California Ballroom C

11:15am

Parker on the Web 2.0: Digital Library Infrastructure for Medieval Manuscripts
When it launched in 2009, the Parker on the Web digital library was among the first full-library digitization projects for medieval materials. Within a short period of time, it became apparent that building portal silos for manuscripts failed to serve the expressed needs of scholarly users while also proving to be a challenge for long-term institutional support and sustainability. Since 2009, the library technology landscape has changed significantly. With the introduction of the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) and shared software like Spotlight (the Blacklight-based exhibits platform) and Mirador (the viewing platform designed for image comparison and interoperability), a component ecosystem has emerged that affords the opportunity to reimagine the manuscript delivery portal as one of many facets for experiencing images of medieval content. Parker on the Web 2.0, the first major rewrite of the site since its initial launch, takes advantage of all of these technologies to provide a rich user experience on a maintainable software platform. The site invites users to engage in cross-repository comparison, reuse and annotation, and serves as a model for the next generation of digital manuscript sites. This presentation will walk through the design and technology choices for the project, user engagement during its development, and future enhancements that make Parker on the Web a dynamic digital collection that can grow with curatorial and scholarly input without putting a strain on the library infrastructure that hosts it.

Speakers
BA

Benjamin Albritton

Digital Manuscripts Program Manager, Digital Library Systems and Services, Stanford University


Friday April 13, 2018 11:15am - 11:45am
Imperial Room

11:15am

Preserving and Using Email of Historical or Cultural Value with ePADD
ePADD is a free and open source software, funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), that enables institutions to collect email of potential historical or cultural value, screen it for sensitive, confidential, or legally-restricted information, and make it discoverable and accessible by scholars. The software primarily accomplishes this goal by incorporating techniques from computer science, including natural language processing and named entity recognition. Glynn Edwards, Assistant Director for Special Collections and Director of the ePADD project, will discuss ePADD in the context of providing access to the email of important historical figures. ePADD allows account holders to review their email before depositing it in a repository, archivists to "process" it for restricted and sensitive data, and complicated searches by researchers.

Speakers
avatar for Glynn Edwards

Glynn Edwards

Assistant Director, Special Collections, Stanford University
As the Assistant Director I focus on the Born-Digital Program & Collection Services division for the Department of Special Collections. I also run the ePADD Project which continues to develop an email archiving and delivery tool.


Friday April 13, 2018 11:15am - 11:45am
Sierra AB

11:15am

Preserving Digital Content at Scale: Meeting the Challenges of AV and Big Data
Since 2013 the Digital Preservation Network (DPN) has been working on developing solutions to enable the preservation of digital content for the next generation of scholars and beyond. DPN members are working together to solve the most difficult and persistent problems facing the community. Audio and moving image content present significant challenges when it comes to long-term preservation. These include scale, cost, and file transfer problems to name a few. DPN has partnered with the University of Southern California and LibNova to develop a preservation node for audio and moving image content (and for other very large data collections) that addresses the most significant challenges. This session will demonstrate the features of this new solution and will discuss how this fits into the broader DPN vision for the long-term preservation of digital content.

Speakers
SG

Sam Gustman

Chief Technology Officer and Associate Dean, University of Southern California
avatar for Mary Molinaro

Mary Molinaro

Executive Direcor, Digital Preservation Network
Digital preservation processes and workflows. Solutions for large and small institutions.


Friday April 13, 2018 11:15am - 11:45am
Harbor Room (3rd FL)

11:15am

Research Data Repositories: Developing and Implementing Infrastructures for Institutional and Consortial Environments
In Fall 2017, Texas State University Libraries launched the Texas State Research Data Repository as part of the Texas Digital Library statewide consortial Data Repository. This presentation overviews development, implementation and infrastructure considerations for any institution or consortia thinking about venturing down online research data repository paths and open access research data. The Texas Data repository innovatively leverages and customizes Harvard's Dataverse for a consortial university environment. This presentation overviews research data repositories, technology considerations and how institutions can pragmatically think about implementing a data repository from working model perspectives. The session will survey the current landscape including types of repositories, needed external partnerships, human resources, and future synergies with other academic library technology infrastructures. This presentation will also provide a framework for overviewing possible service models, repository architectures and wider perspectives, possibilities, and challenges with regards to data repositories through the pragmatic example of the Texas State University Data repository.

Speakers
avatar for Ray Uzwyshyn

Ray Uzwyshyn

Director, Collections and Digital Services, Texas State University
Ray is currently Director of Collection and Digital Services, Texas State University Libraries. Previously, he served as Director of Online Libraries (American Public University System), Head, Digital and Learning Technologies (University of West Florida) and Web Services Librarian... Read More →



Friday April 13, 2018 11:15am - 11:45am
Plaza C

11:15am

Text Data Mining (TDM) Research Using Copyrighted and Use-Limited Text Data Sets: Developing an Agenda to Support Scholarly Use
Digital text corpora and text data mining (TDM) tools are enabling new discoveries through computational analytics. A high percentage of the texts, however, are protected by copyright, or subject to license agreements that limit access and use. These restrictions can complicate a researcher's efforts to access texts and perform computational analysis, as well as to communicate the output and related methods to a broader audience. Increasingly, libraries are getting engaged as intermediaries between content providers and scholars to facilitate access to text datasets. Still, the process of interpreting or obtaining rights to perform computational analysis is arduous, and the results of the research often cannot be adequately documented to support reproducibility in a scholarly climate focused on evidence. The perceived high barrier to entry for TDM can lead to one of two outcomes: a scholar abandons the research project or moves ahead using unsanctioned approaches, such as screen-scraping, to assemble and mine the corpus. This project briefing provides an update on research funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services to hold a national forum with key stakeholders to develop a research and implementation agenda for libraries that work with scholars and content providers to enable streamlined access to copyrighted and licensed texts for data mining research. In particular, we focus on the perspectives and the SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analyses provided by the National Forum attendees.

Project team:
Bertram Ludäscher, PI, School of Information Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Beth Sandore Namachchivaya, co-PI, University Library, University of Waterloo
Megan Senseney, co-PI, School of Information Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Eleanor Dickson, University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Speakers
avatar for Beth Sandore Namachchivaya

Beth Sandore Namachchivaya

University Librarian, University of Waterloo


Friday April 13, 2018 11:15am - 11:45am
Santa Fe

11:45am

Lunch
Friday April 13, 2018 11:45am - 1:00pm
Garden Terrace/SD Ballroom (4th FL)

1:00pm

Battening Down the Hatches: Securing the Institutional Repository
Software providers and repository administrators alike understand the need for data privacy and security. The bepress product team is meeting new and evolving needs by ensuring that the platform complies with the upcoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR); employing Transport Layer Security (TSL); and mitigating the security risk posed by Spectre and Meltdown, two major security flaws that may grant hackers access to sensitive information. This briefing will provide an overview of these security developments. It will then share a more in-depth view of how the bepress team is leveraging Elsevier's company-wide endeavors to ensure Digital Commons and the Expert Gallery Suite's compliance with upcoming GDPR legislation, designed to protect the personal data privacy of citizens of the European Union. Through the process, bepress is expanding that level of privacy and protection to its customers and end users worldwide.



Speakers
IJ

IJsbrand Jan Aalbersberg

Senior Vice President, Research Integrity, Elsevier
NJ

Nicole Johnson

Product Manager, Digital Commons, bepress


Friday April 13, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Imperial Room

1:00pm

Building Digital Coherence Through Collective Action: Creating DURAble Trust and DPNing Scholarship by Moving Together
The University of Michigan Library is in the midst of a once-in-a-generation shift in all of its major digital collections, preservation, bibliographic, and information discovery platforms. Over the last two decades, the repositories and systems we have built have achieved surprising scale; across our web presence, we serve over 4 million users a year and provide an annual download stream of over 70 terabytes of data that supports research, teaching, and scholarship around the globe. While our tactics and choices over those two decades have proven successful, it is questionable how much further we can scale on a rather loose confederation of dozens of systems and hundreds of interfaces. A core part of our strategy for creating a coherent, adaptable, and scalable platform to serve the next 20 years is to shift significant resources (content, applications, dollars, hours, training, and intellectual effort) into building, supporting, and extending community infrastructure. In this presentation, we will outline Michigan's strategy and bring together leaders of our foundational communities--which, combined, are hundreds of institutions strong--to hold a panel discussion about coherent action and collective direction.

Speakers
avatar for Chip German

Chip German

Program Director, APTrust
APTrust, University of Virginia Library, digital preservation, scholarly communication
DH

Debra Hanken Kurtz

CEO, DuraSpace
avatar for Mary Molinaro

Mary Molinaro

Executive Direcor, Digital Preservation Network
Digital preservation processes and workflows. Solutions for large and small institutions.
MY

Maurice York

Associate University Librarian for Library Information Technology, University of Michigan


Friday April 13, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Harbor Room (3rd FL)

1:00pm

Developing Library Support for Publishing Expansive Digital Humanities Projects
This session will explore how research libraries can support expansive digital humanities publishing projects-projects that are interactive and dynamic in their content as they span and often grow over time across multiple content types, audiences, and contributors. Recognizing that the digital humanities are often not static, and change and grow as the scholarship and its community expands, what role can libraries and the institutions that back them play in planning, growing and sustaining these publications? How can institutions adequately evaluate and reward this type of scholarship, particularly when the audiences and collaborators for these publications extend beyond the academic community? This session is based on work done under a new Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant to address library services in support of expansive digital publishing. The grant focuses on investigating five areas of support: 1) planning, 2) resource allocation and production; 3) discovery; 4) evaluation; and 5) preservation and sustainability. Workshop leaders will briefly introduce each of these ideas, and participants will be asked to actively contribute in a roundtable discussion format structured around each topic. The aim of that discussion is to help form a collective understanding of what works and what doesn't in establishing ongoing institutional support for expansive digital projects. We also plan to incorporate elements of this discussion into a comprehensive report, to be released in summer 2018, that will offer a framework for research libraries to develop sustainable services within their institutional context in support of expansive digital publishing.

Speakers
avatar for David Hansen

David Hansen

Associate University Librarian for Research, Collections & Scholarly Communication, Duke University Libraries
I'm Duke's librarian responsible for the Libraries' general research services and collections. My division of the library includes support for Duke researchers across the scholarly communication lifecycle, from the development of the library collections in anticipation of researcher... Read More →
avatar for Paolo Mangiafico

Paolo Mangiafico

Coordinator of Scholarly Communications Technology, Duke University Libraries
Paolo Mangiafico serves as Coordinator of Scholarly Communication Technologies at Duke University Libraries, and as director of the Mellon-funded Scholarly Communication Institute (trianglesci.org). In a former role as Director of Digital Information Strategy in the Office of the... Read More →
avatar for Liz Milewicz

Liz Milewicz

Head, Digital Scholarship Services, Digital Scholarship Services, Duke University
Project planning, management, and transitioning Internships and other experiential training in digital scholarship Building new forms of literacy (e.g., publishing) into academic courses


Friday April 13, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Plaza C

1:00pm

Makerspaces in the Academic Library
The ROI of Sustaining an Academic Library Makerspace (Wong-Welch, Jeffery)

Most interest in library makerspaces has focused on the implementation stage of such spaces by highlighting the aspects of funding and space setup. With its makerspace entering its fourth year of existence, the San Diego State University Library has turned to investigating the return on investment, and sustainability, of its program. This presentation will address how to leverage data and lessons learned to demonstrate the opportunities afforded by a library makerspace that are directly beneficial for students, librarians, and the library. It will highlight the various ways a makerspace community impacts student success with regard to academics, social relationships, and career-readiness. It will define how the makerspace has helped evolve the liaison relationship to a more meaningful connection between librarians and students. Finally, it will share how the makerspace has transformed the context of the library for many, doing so in a sustainable manner that can be maintained with only nominal support.

Makerspace Creation through Student-led Collaboration (Ferguson, McGrath)

In response to the rise of arts and design curricula on campus, four organizations at the University of California, Berkeley joined forces to create a makerspace program. Educational Technology Services, the University Library, and Student Affairs Information Technology partnered with b.makerspace, a collective of design-oriented student clubs, to form an experimental, student-led, discovery lab. Our niche, in the ecosystem of campus makerspaces, is as a point of entry for students interested in learning the basics of 3D printing, virtual reality, basic electronics, and an evolving set of design methods and technologies. The result has been a successful cooperative with staff creating an operational structure to support student creativity and innovation.

Speakers
avatar for Jean Ferguson

Jean Ferguson

Learning and Research Communities Librarian, University of California, Berkeley
avatar for Keven Jeffery

Keven Jeffery

Digital Technologies Librarian, San Diego State University
Keven is the librarian responsible for investigating and implementing emerging digital technologies and online applications at San Diego State University. Keven also maintains the library's public facing websites, online projects, and research tools.
OM

Owen McGrath

Associate Director, Teaching and Learning Spaces and Operations, University of California, Berkeley
Owen McGrath, Ph.D., Associate Director, Teaching & Learning Spaces and Operations at UC Berkeley; Owen leads UC Berkeley's design and support services for technology-enhanced teaching and learning spaces.
avatar for Jenny Wong-Welch

Jenny Wong-Welch

STEM Librarian, San Diego State University


Friday April 13, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
California Ballroom C

1:00pm

The Privileged Link: Open Access, Version of Record, or Let the User Decide?
As the availability of open access (OA) copies continues to grow, platforms and libraries are increasingly facing the possibility of linking users to version of record copies as well as to OA but non-version of record copies of the same article. Some advocate prioritizing linking to OA copies while others argue that the version of record should be prioritized. In many cases, this is a question of whether to link to a copy that the library has licensed over the copies that are freely available; however, the same conundrum can occur with respect to publisher-hosted OA content vs. copies available in institutional repositories and on preprint servers.

Alternatively, some recommend that a library present all possible options and allow the user to decide which version they prefer, which creates a number of user experience and education challenges. In yet other cases, the library will not have the choice as the platforms themselves (e.g., DSDimensions and Web of Science) link to OA copies within the native interface and subscribed content requires an institutional license that then uses the library's link resolver. While librarians and publishers are relatively conversant in the types of OA and the manuscript-to-article publication process, many users will be unaware of the potential differences among versions and be confused or frustrated by increasing complexity in access choices.

This issue-oriented session will explore the implications of these choices and how they might align with different strategic priorities for libraries and platforms. Questions include: What principles can be helpful as a library explores these decisions? How can a library engage its user community in these decisions? What are the impacts on other library services (e.g., instruction and interlibrary loan) of the different approaches? If desired, how can a library integrate OA and version of record linking in the same discovery/access system? What staff training and user education programs do the different approaches demand? Should the way articles are cited be changed to privilege OA copies? If OA is easily linked or if users choose OA copies over the version of record, could libraries cancel subscriptions and reallocate funds? Do users really need the version of record?

Speakers
MA

Maria Aghazarian

Digital Resources and Scholarly Communications Specialist, Swarthmore College
avatar for Lisa Hinchliffe

Lisa Hinchliffe

Professor/Librarian, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Information Literacy, Library Assessment, Value of Academic Libraries, Inclusion, Mentoring
avatar for Aaron Tay

Aaron Tay

Library Analytics Manager, Singapore Management University
Librarian. Blogger @ musingsaboutlibrarianship.blogspot.sg
avatar for Johan Tilstra

Johan Tilstra

CEO, Lean Library


Friday April 13, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Santa Fe

1:00pm

The Realities of Research Data Management
In recent years, research data management (RDM) has assumed an increasingly prominent place in scholarly communication, funder requirements, codes of academic practice, university research strategy, and even national policy. This presentation will share the findings of The Realities of Research Data Management, an OCLC Research project, which explores the context and choices research universities face in building or acquiring RDM capacity. Findings are derived from the detailed case studies of four research universities in four distinct national contexts, and a series of four reports offers a simple framework for navigating the RDM service space, examines the incentives for acquiring RDM capacity, explores how research universities plan and prioritize RDM services, and highlights the decisions to build, acquire, collaborate, and scale. As one of the case studies in the Realities of Research Data Management study, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will share insights about how it has structured its program to enable collaboration both within the library and beyond to scale service offerings. Specific examples of service areas that engage local specialists from the archives, digital preservation, metadata, and numerous subject areas to leverage the library's in-house capacity, interest, and expertise will be presented with emphasis on reciprocal benefits.

Speakers
HI

Heidi Imker

Director, Research Data Service, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Heidi Imker is the Director of the Research Data Service (RDS) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Heidi holds a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Illinois, and did her postdoctoral research at the Harvard Medical School.
avatar for Constance Malpas

Constance Malpas

Strategic Intelligence Manager and Research Scientist, OCLC Research
Constance Malpas is Strategic Intelligence Manager & Research Scientist at OCLC (San Mateo, CA). Her research has focused on reconfiguration of academic print collections in the networked environment, especially the emergence of shared print preservation models; the impacts of emerging... Read More →



Friday April 13, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Sierra AB

2:00pm

Break
Friday April 13, 2018 2:00pm - 2:15pm
California Foyer

2:15pm

Closing Plenary: Towards a High-Performance National Research Platform Enabling Digital Research
Abstract:  Research in data-intensive fields is increasingly multi-investigator and multi-institutional, depending on ever more rapid access to ultra-large heterogeneous and widely distributed datasets, which in turn is demanding new technological solutions in visualization, machine learning, and high-performance cyberinfrastructure. I will describe how my NSF-funded Pacific Research Platform (PRP), which provides an Internet platform with 100-1000 times the bandwidth of today's commodity Internet to all the research universities on the West Coast, is being designed from the application needs of researchers.  The disciplines which are engaged in partnering with the PRP range from particle physics to climate to human health, as well as archaeology, digital libraries, and social media analysis. The next stage, well underway, is understanding how to scale this prototype cyberinfrastructure to a National and Global Research Platform.

Larry Smarr is the founding Director of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2), a UC San Diego/UC Irvine partnership, and holds the Harry E. Gruber professorship in Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) at UC San Diego’s Jacobs School. Before that, he was Professor of Physics and Astronomy and the founding director of the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at UIUC. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, as well as a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2006 he received the IEEE Computer Society Tsutomu Kanai Award for his lifetime achievements in distributed computing systems and in 2014 the Golden Goose Award. He served on the NASA Advisory Council to 4 NASA Administrators, was chair of the NASA Information Technology Infrastructure Committee and the NSF Advisory Committee on Cyberinfrastructure, and for 8 years he was a member of the NIH Advisory Committee to the NIH Director, serving 3 directors. He is currently the Principal Investigator on the NSF Pacific Research Platform grants.

Smarr Subject of Feature Story on Personalizing Surgery
in March Edition of The Atlantic:
https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2018/03/larry-smarr-the-man-who-saw-inside-himself/550883/

Speakers
avatar for Larry Smarr

Larry Smarr

Director, California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2)
Larry Smarr is the founding Director of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2), a UC San Diego/UC Irvine partnership, and holds the Harry E. Gruber professorship in Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) at UC San Diego’s Jacobs School. Before that, he was Professor of Physics and Astronomy and the founding director of the National Center for Supercomputing... Read More →


Friday April 13, 2018 2:15pm - 3:30pm
California Ballroom AB